5 Symptoms Most Veterinarians Miss that Can Kill Your Dog

That title may appear to be flat out hyperbole, but I assure you, it is not.

The fact is that more dogs are put to death because of excessive aggression than are put down because they are too old or sick to go on. And aggression, you will learn from Canine Hypothyroidism: Detection, Diagnosis And Prevention, is but one of dozens of common symptoms dogs suffer from when their Thyroid is not functioning correctly. 

Personally, I found that a shocking statistic.

And I lived it; I lived with the reality that euthanasia was a real and gruesome probability for my Bouvier, Wil. He was 3 years-old when he was given to me by his breeders. They explained that their reason for ditching him with me was that he “didn’t care much for the show world.” They claimed he “showed an aptitude for life on a farm.” (Yeah, right. Decoded, this meant, “He loved farm animals– they are so very tasty!”)

When I got Wil at age 3 he was animal and human aggressive. When he saw a cat (human, dog, etc…) outside, he would attack it through our plate glass window.

You’ll learn in Canine Hypothyroidism: Detection, Diagnosis And Prevention that Wil had a half-dozen hypothyroidism symptoms. These were typical red flags of this easily addressed condition. But for the first year and a half we were together, he suffered them—and no vet spotted them until sudden weight gain drew one vet’s attention.

Since writing this book, I have spoken to several people who made what they thought was the only option left: to put the dog down… Each had exhausted all avenues… except… that which is obvious once one has read this book.

Please do read this book. It contains information every dog lover should know.

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